Everyone Else is Normal goes on air!

Today, my blog had the honour of being featured on national radio.  OK, UCB isn’t exactly mainstream, but it is one of only two Christian radio stations that broadcast in the UK and has a decent following.

UCB contacted me last week after reading my post for LICC about the summer holidays being a time for throwing out the clock and giving our kids and ourselves much needed time to chill out and day dream.  They wanted me to join them on a live interview for their Current Affairs programme to talk about the topic for a full 8 minutes.  Being live, I was a tad nervous, probably more about the fact that my two children and a puppy were lurking around the house and could at any moment cause a small disturbance! But I know my kids and dog, and could count on them to not do such a thing….

Anyway, it went very well, thanks largely to the interviewer, Vicky Gibbens, who was very professional and relaxed, putting me at ease right from the start.  My friends who managed to catch it (one in the car en route to her holiday destination) said I came across really well, “very eloquent and natural”, and ‘balanced”.

To listen to the 8 minute interview, click here and fast forward it to 2hrs 42 mins. Only available till Wednesday 3 August.

Thank you UCB radio for giving me and my blog this airspace!

@UCBmedia

Becoming a regular writer for London Institute of Contemporary Christianity

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I’m very pleased to have been asked to become a regular writer for the London Institute of Contemporary Christianity, a highly respected Christian think-tank and training centre on all matters to do with making faith relevant to the workplace.  Their weekly feature, Connecting with Culture, is a short commentary piece on a current issue in the news or media with a Christian faith perspective.  The other regular writers are people I have a lot of respect for – Brian Draper, Jennie Pollock, Nick Spencer to name a few.

The subject I chose for my first post for last Friday was about embracing the no-agenda, day-dreaming time that holidays offer – for ourselves but particularly the children.  If you liked this, you might like to read this post I wrote a few years ago which unpacks this issue a little more for what it means for children, and looks at the Greek concepts of time, ‘kairos’ and ‘chronos’.

To my delight, UCB Radio picked up my post on LICC website and contacted me this week asking for a live interview about this on their Current Affairs programme which I gave today on UCB1.  Click here for the interview, available for the next 6 days, fast forward it to 2hrs 40 mins in to hear me.

How to talk to your kids about #Brexit upset

Since last Friday when the results of the EU Referendum on Brexit were announced, the TV, radio, internet and adults seem to be talking about nothing else but Brexit. No matter which way your household voted it is highly likely that your children will be used to furrowed brows, heated discussions, maybe anger or elation, and possibly a fair bit of strong language.

“What’s going on??!!” wrote one friend of my 12 year old daughter’s on her iMessage thread last Friday morning. “Everyone’s going crazy :-(”

Upset & Relief signs Indeed. Many children, both young and teens, are confused, anxious and worried about what this all means. The older ones are angry that they never got to vote yet are all too aware that the older generation voted a different way from how they would have done. The younger ones are genuinely confused:

Mummy,” said my friend’s 8 year old son. “If we do get separated from Europe, will we feel it? Will it feel like an earthquake or something?”

So what do we do or say to allay their fears? Continue reading

Now is the time for leadership – starting with us #Brexit

The shocking result of the referendum last Thursday detonated on Friday morning sending people into either a tail spin of panic, or quiet jubilation.  The unthinkable had happened: the majority (by a hair’s breath) of the British population wanted out from Europe.

As most of my friends were Remain voters, my twitter and Facebook account was full of shock, horror and anger.  None of us really believed it would swing this way.  We knew people were disgruntled, disenfranchised and too ready to listen to disingenuous politicians pointing at migrants as the reason for the lack of GP appointments and school places.  But we didn’t realise it was quite this big, nor that a normally conservative populace would take the radical option, an option that most people had no idea of the full and very real consequences.

And so the proverbial hit the fan.   Continue reading

In or Out? Why this EU vote is so hard for a post-modern society

decision-making-300x300As we draw near to 23 June, the date of the UK Referendum on the EU, it is becoming clearer to me why this is going to be such a tough vote.

It’s not simply because the issues are complex, the case far from clear cut and the reasons for voting to Leave after 40 years as understandable as the reasons for staying.

Whilst these are all very real, I wonder if it is because we are being asked to make a decisive choice: Yes or No. Continue reading